wild nights

‘Wild Nights with Emily’ Screening and Director’s Q&A, October 26, 2019

wild nights with emilyJoin us for free screening of the SxSW dramatic comedy ‘Wild Nights with Emily,’ — starring Molly Shannon as the beloved poet Emily Dickinson. Followed by a Q&A with director Madeleine Olnek, and Emily Dickinson Museum curator Jane Wald. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the movie IndieWire called “hilarious” and “touching”! 

Location: The screening will take place in Lipton Lecture Hall in the Amherst College Science Center on the east side of campus from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The hall is room E110 and is located on the first floor by the cafe.

Parking: Parking is available along East Drive and Merrill Science Drive and no permit is required (even if indicated).

About the Film

In the mid-19th century, Emily Dickinson is writing prolifically, baking gingerbread, and enjoying a passionate, lifelong relationship with another woman, her friend and sister-in-law Susan. Beloved comic Molly Shannon leads in this humorous yet bold reappraisal of Dickinson, informed by her private letters. While seeking publication of some of the 1,789 poems written during her lifetime, Emily (Shannon) finds herself facing a troupe of male literary gatekeepers too confused by her genius to take her work seriously. Instead her work attracts the attention of an ambitious woman editor, who also sees Emily as a convenient cover for her own role in buttoned-up Amherst’s most bizarre love triangle.

About the Filmmaker

Madeleine Olnek is a New York City based playwright and filmmaker. Her third feature film, Wild Nights With Emily, was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and awards from NYSCA and Jerome Foundation funds. Her second feature, The Foxy Merkins, included screenings at Sundance 2014, BAM Cinemafest, Lincoln Center, and an NYC theatrical run at IFP. The film had its international premiere at the Moscow Film Festival. Her debut feature, Codependent Lesbian Sex Alien Seeks Same, premiered at Sundance 2011. Its screening included MoMa, The Viennale and the Festival do Rio. Nominated for a Gotham award, it had theatrical runs in LA and NYC. Her award-winning and widely screened comedy shorts, “Countertransference” (2009), and “Hold Up” (2006), were official selections of Sundance; “Make Room For Phyllis” (2007) premiered at Sarasota. Olnek was awarded best female short film director at Sundance in 2009, by LA’s Women In Film organization.

finnerty

Emily Dickinson and her British Contemporaries, November 9, 2019

4:30-6PM at the Emily Dickinson Museum Homestead

Scholar Páraic Finnerty presents this lecture on Emily Dickinson and her British contemporaries. He will discuss Dickinson’s reading of and response to three of her favorite British poets—Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, and Alfred Tennyson—in relation to their nineteenth-century U.S. reception. The lecture will focus on the impact of Tennyson’s and Browning’s development and popularization of the dramatic lyric (later termed the dramatic monologue) on Dickinson’s poetics. In the process, Finnerty will explore how this context provides a new way of interpreting Dickinson’s poetry. Time for questions and answers will follow the talk.

This program is free and open to the public.

finnerty

About the speaker: Páraic Finnerty is Reader in English and American Literature at the University of Portsmouth. He is the author of Emily Dickinson’s Shakespeare and co-author of Victorian Celebrity Culture and Tennyson’s Circle (2013). He is currently working on a monograph entitled Dickinson and her British Contemporaries, forthcoming from Edinburgh University Press. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Emily Dickinson International Society and serves on the Editorial Board of the Emily Dickinson Journal.

apf 2018

Call for Proposals for the Amherst Poetry Festival, July 3-25, 2019

poetry festival

The Emily Dickinson Museum is now accepting proposals for our seventh annual Amherst Poetry Festival, September 19-22, 2019!
 
Produced by the Emily Dickinson Museum, with support from the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, the Beveridge Family Foundation, Amherst Business Improvement District, Massachusetts Cultural Council, and Jones Library, the Amherst Poetry Festival celebrates the poetic legacy of Emily Dickinson and the contemporary creativity of the Pioneer Valley and beyond.
 
Proposals for audience-centered workshopspanel discussions, and participatory programs are welcome. The Steering Committee especially welcomes the following:

    • Submissions from groups of 2 – 5 poets
    • Submissions that engage young attendees and those new to poetry
    • Submissions that involve hands-on components
A $200 honorarium will be provided per event. Event facilitators are asked to pay their own travel and lodging expenses.
 
Proposals should be designed for one of the following program slots: (Individuals may submit for more than one program slot)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2019
  • Poetry workshops for students of high school (grades 9-12). 45-minute classroom session, to be offered up to four times between 7:50am to 3pm. Partner schools will be shared with selected poets and will include schools in Hampshire and Hampden counties.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2019
  • Daytime poetry workshops, panels, or participatory programs open to the public to occur at a variety of Festival venues, including on site at the Emily Dickinson Museum, at the Jones Library, Hope and Feathers Art Gallery, etc. (Examples of participatory programs might include mobile activities, resource booths, etc.). Event sessions are typically an hour and a half long. 
Submission Guidelines:
  • Only submissions made in the online form will be considered. There is no fee to submit proposals.
  • Following your submission, please e-mail your resume/cv to edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org. 
    • Include “POETRY FESTIVAL SUBMISSION” in the title of the e-mail. We can accept .pdf, .doc, .docx files.
      If applicable, you may also submit an image in .jpg, .jpeg, .gif, and .png format.
  • Selected facilitators will be notified by August 9, and will be asked to sign a letter of agreement confirming their participation in the Festival.
  • Submissions Due: Thursday, July 25, 2019, 11:59 pm EST.

Submissions will be judged on the following:

  • Originality – Is your idea bold and intriguing? Will it offer something new to our Festival?
  • Quality – Does the submission reflect thoughtful preparation? How are you uniquely qualified to facilitate this program?
  • Audience – Have you clearly outlined participatory elements? How does your proposal contribute to community-building for the Amherst Poetry Festival? 
  • Special consideration will be given to Pioneer Valley and Massachusetts-based facilitators.
 
Questions? Email us at edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org
Image of "In Suspension" in the Homestead Conservatory

In Suspension: A site-specific art installation, June 21 – September 9, 2019

 

Image of "In Suspension" in the Homestead Conservatory
 
Wonder – is not
precisely knowing 
And not precisely
knowing not – 
A beautiful but
bleak condition 
He has not lived
who has not felt – 
Suspense – is his
maturer Sister – 
Whether Adult Delight is Pain 
Or of itself a
new misgiving – 
This is the
Gnat that
mangles men – 
-F1347

In Suspension

A site-specific art installation at the Emily Dickinson Museum featuring work by Tereza Swanda, Ingrid Pichler, and Fletcher Boote

The Emily Dickinson Museum is pleased to present this first site-specific art installation in the restored Homestead conservatory. In this small greenhouse Dickinson tended flowers “near and foreign,” forging a deep connection that permeated her poetry and daily life. Imagine dirt under the poet’s fingernails as she wrote the poems that immortalized flowers blooming in her garden, home, and Amherst’s fields and woodlands.

This mixed-media installation aims to forge the colors Dickinson saw from the conservatory out into her landscape. In this meditation on suspension, colors change based on the atmosphere, and the space between subjects. Light from color gels is cast throughout the room by projection and refraction. Sound is a complimentary element to color.

The installation is best viewed from inside the conservatory, which is open from 11AM-4:30PM each day the Museum is open (Wednesday through Monday). All are welcome inside to view the installation, but the space is restricted to four people at a time. Photography inside the installation is most welcome.

About the artists:

Tereza Swanda teaches at Dean College and has 20 years of color theory through painting. She graduated from Mass Art in Boston with a degree in Sculpture and Painting and holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She has exhibited her own work extensively both locally, nationally and internationally over the last ten years. Learn more: https://www.mamatereza.net/

Ingrid Pichler specializes in site-specific glass installation for the private and public sector and is a visiting lecturer at Salem State University. Pichler has been working in architectural glass for almost thirty years. Throughout her career, her hands-on approach has enabled her to develop a keen understanding of the transformative potential of light in the context of architectural glass. Most of her works have been commissioned, location-specific installations, utilizing a wide range of techniques from traditional painting and staining, to new innovation for fusing and casting in contemporary glass technology. Learn more: http://www.pichlerart.com/

Fletcher Boote is a composer and performer investigating nuances of human relationships as they are expressed in arrangements of sounds. She has recently taught sound healing and vocal workshops at Princeton University and lead courses at Johnson State College. Boote has been working in sound for over a decade and has worked with students of Meredith Monk. Learn more: http://fletcherboote.com/

 

Poetry Discussion Group, November 8, 2019

poetry discussion groupThe Emily Dickinson Museum’s Poetry Discussion Group meets monthly, September through May, for lively conversation about Emily Dickinson’s poetry and letters. The Poetry Discussion Group meets at the Center for Humanistic Inquiry, on the second floor of Amherst College’s Frost Library. Participants should proceed directly to the Library and do not need to stop at the Museum. While no RSVP is required, participants are invited to email edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org to receive a list of poems for discussion. Attendees are welcome to bring a bag lunch. Beverages and a sweet snack are provided.

November Poetry Discussion Group will meet on November 8, 2019 at 12PM. 

November’s discussion will consider how the nineteenth century dramatic lyric monologue, developed by Browning and Tennyson, impacted Dickinson’s poetry. In many letters, Dickinson underlined how important these British poets, along with Elizabeth Barrett Browning, were for her work. In July 1862, Dickinson even echoed Browning’s well-known definition of the dramatic lyric when she told Higginson: “When I state myself, as the Representative of the Verse – it does not mean – me – but a supposed person” (L268). Together, we will consider how Dickinson employs—and complicates—the lyric monologue in her own poetry by focusing on a range of poems from the 1860s.

Facilitator: Páraic Finnerty is Reader in English and American Literature at the University of Portsmouth. He is the author of Emily Dickinson’s Shakespeare and co-author of Victorian Celebrity Culture and Tennyson’s Circle (2013). He is currently working on a monograph entitled Dickinson and her British Contemporaries, forthcoming from Edinburgh University Press. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Emily Dickinson International Society and serves on the Editorial Board of the Emily Dickinson Journal.

Meeting Notes

  • Center of Humanistic Inquiry Address: 61 Quadrangle Dr, Amherst. This event will be held in the seminar room, the classroom on the left at the top of the stairs.
  • Parking – attendees may park in the Amherst College Alumni Lot and walk to the library free of charge. Metered parking is available closer to campus on the Town Common. Some select spots and accessible parking are available on campus, around the quad and behind the Frost Library. Participants with a state-issued handicap placard may park in any accessible spaces on campus. See the Amherst College campus parking map for more information.
  • Program cost – Drop-in fees are as follows: $12 for EDM Friends (Members); $15 for Non-Members.
arts night 2

Amherst Arts Night Plus Open Mic and Featured Artists, November 7, 2019

Join us at the Emily Dickinson Museum during Amherst Arts Night Plus for our monthly Open Mic. Poets, writers, and performers of any kind are welcome! Come early to view the pop-up, contemporary art exhibition in the Homestead by our featured artist. The open mic begins at 6:00 p.m. and will be followed by this month’s featured readers. Those who would like to share their work should arrive between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. to sign up. 

Featured Artist: Paintings and film are on display from 5-8PM 

Barbara Zecchi, Professor and Director of the Film Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is a film scholar, film critic, and video-essayist. Born in London, and raised and educated in Italy, she grew intellectually in Spain and in the United States. She received a PhD from the University of California Los Angeles, and joined the Program of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at UMass after teaching at different universities in Europe and in the U.S. (such as Carlos III University of Madrid, California State University, and the Johns Hopkins). Her research and teaching interests include Spanish, Catalan and Latin American cinemas, feminist film theory, film adaptation theory, gender studies and aging studies, and the use of technology in the humanities. Both in her scholarly publications and in her creative work (video-graphic essays, paintings, collages and photographs) she explores and deconstructs gender-based stereotypes and discrimination. She is the author of the books La pantalla sexuada (“The Gendered Screen,” Cátedra 2015), and Desenfocadas (“Women Out of Focus,” Icaria 2014); and editor or co-editor of volumes such Tras las lentes de Isabel Coixet (2017), Gynocine: Teoría de género, filmología y práxis cinematográfica (2013), Teoría y práctica de la adaptación fílmica (2011),  among others. She has lectured and presented her digital work extensively in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Latin America. Her fascination with Italian futurist art and Venetian glassblowing (rulli) is evoked and persistent in her creative work. She inherited this fascination from her grandfathers. Antonio specialized in the legendary tradition of Venetian glassblowing. Many of his filigree stained glass windows can be still admired in several villas in Veneto countryside. Umberto was a renowned shoe designer who created futurist shoe models currently shown at the D’Annunzio Museo in Arezzo, The Vittoriale degli italiani of Gardone Riviera, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. 

Barbara Zecchi is the co-founder and vice-president of the international research network CinemAGEnder and the founder and director of the Digital Humanities Project “Gynocine: Feminisms, Genders and Cinemas.” She is the founder and co-curator of the UMass Catalan Film Festival, and collaborates in the organization of the UMass Latin American Film Festival. She is Associate Member of the Film Academy of Spain (Academia de las Artes y las Ciencias Cinematográficas de España).

Featured Readers: Featured readers follow the open mic

“Emily Dickinson In Translation”: During November’s Arts Night, enjoy a presentation of multi-lingual readings and short discussions on the practice of translating the poet’s words, presented by the Translation Center of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Center is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A unique enterprise that combines business services with academics, the Center offers translation, interpreting, workshops, language consulting, and much more to a variety of clients including small businesses, multinational corporations, museums, law firms, hospitals, NGOs, filmmakers, advertising firms, educational institutions, and individuals. 

poetry discussion group

Poetry Discussion Group, October 18, 2019

poetry discussion groupThe Emily Dickinson Museum’s Poetry Discussion Group meets monthly, September through May, for lively conversation about Emily Dickinson’s poetry and letters. The Poetry Discussion Group meets at the Center for Humanistic Inquiry, on the second floor of Amherst College’s Frost Library. Participants should proceed directly to the Library and do not need to stop at the Museum. While no RSVP is required, participants are invited to email edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org to receive a list of poems for discussion. Attendees are welcome to bring a bag lunch. Beverages and a sweet snack are provided.

October’s Poetry Discussion Group will meet on October 18, 2019 at 12PM. 

Topic: Who’s Who in the Dickinson Lexicon 
What do Queen Elizabeth, Captain Kidd, William Tell, and Sappho have in common? Give up? They are all named in Emily Dickinson poems! We know that Dickinson populated her verse with flora and fauna, but what people did she choose to include – and why? In this session, we will look at the complete list of historical figures mentioned in Dickinson’s poetry (not including biblical or literary characters, family members, and friends) and discuss several poems in which some of them serve as metaphors or analogies.

Facilitator: Bruce M. Penniman taught writing, speech, and literature at Amherst Regional High School from 1971 until 2007. He is the site director of the Western Massachusetts Writing Project and lecturer at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. In 1999 he was Massachusetts Teacher of the Year and a finalist for National Teacher of the Year, and he is the author of Building the English Classroom: Foundations, Support, Success (NCTE, 2009). He has served as a teacher curriculum mentor in all three NEH Emily Dickinson: Person, Poetry, and Place workshops and has facilitated discussions in the Poetry Discussion Group on many topics.

Meeting Notes

  • Center of Humanistic Inquiry Address: 61 Quadrangle Dr, Amherst
  • Parking – attendees may park in the Amherst College Alumni Lot and walk to the library free of charge. Metered parking is available closer to campus on the Town Common. Some select spots and accessible parking are available on campus, around the quad and behind the Frost Library. Participants with a state-issued handicap placard may park in any accessible spaces on campus. See the Amherst College campus parking map for more information.
  • Program cost – Drop-in fees are as follows: $12 for EDM Friends (Members); $15 for Non-Members.

 

field school

Findings from the Archaeology Field School, October 13, 2019

Two volunteers dig in the garden at the Emily Dickinson Museum4:30PM-5:45PM at the Emily Dickinson Museum Homestead

On October 13, view Emily Dickinson’s world through the eyes of an archaeologist. Join us for a presentation at the Emily Dickinson Museum by the faculty and students of the University of Massachusetts Amherst Archaeological Field School as they share their findings from their work at the Emily Dickinson Museum. Students will highlight pivotal discoveries that shed new light on the archaeological underpinnings of the Dickinson home. Find out firsthand how archaeology informs the Museum’s preservation and restoration projects!

This program is free and open to the public, and is offered as part of Massachusetts Archaeology Month.

For more information, please email EDMprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

eric nathan

“Some Favored Nook”: A Song Cycle by Eric Nathan, October 6, 2019

4PM-5:30PM at The Amherst Woman’s Club, 35 Triangle Street, Amherst

“moving… momentous… captivatingly rich… breathtaking… stunning…
a work that deserves to be heard again and again.” —TheaterJones

The Emily Dickinson Museum is pleased to present “Some Favored Nook,” a song cycle by Eric Nathan inspired by the significant correspondence between Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Eric Nathan’s original composition places Dickinson and Higginson’s writings at the center of the music, using these pivotal texts as a lens through which to view the social, political, and cultural issues of this chapter in American history. Filled with themes of abolition, civil rights, women’s rights, the effects of war, love, and death, the song cycle will be performed on Sunday, October 6.

The correspondence between Dickinson and Higginson spanned twenty-four years and offers an intimate look into Dickinson’s private world as well as Higginson’s involvement in major social and political issues of the day. As the commanding officer of the First South Carolina Volunteers, the first black regiment in the Civil War, Higginson was also a noted supporter of women poets and published the first collection of Dickinson’s poetry after her death. Nathan’s work sets excerpts from Dickinson’s letters and poems sent to Higginson to music, along with excerpts from Higginson’s essays and diaries, since many of his letters in reply are lost.

*Parking for this event is available at the Amherst Woman’s Club 

Tickets for this event may now be purchased online. Tickets will also be available at the door. 

Please email EDMPrograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org for more information.

About the artists:

Eric Nathan, Composer

Eric Nathan‘s music has been called “as diverse as it is arresting” with a “constant vein of ingenuity and expressive depth” (San Francisco Chronicle), “thoughtful and inventive” (The New Yorker), and “clear, consistently logical no matter how surprising the direction, and emotionally expressive without being simplistic or sentimental” (New York Classical Review). Nathan is a 2013 Rome Prize Fellow and 2014 Guggenheim Fellow, and has garnered acclaim internationally through performances by Andris Nelsons and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic’s Scharoun Ensemble, soprano Dawn Upshaw, violinist Jennifer Koh, at the New York Philharmonic’s 2014 and 2016 Biennials, and at the Tanglewood, Aspen, Aldeburgh, Cabrillo, Yellow Barn, and MATA festivals. Nathan currently serves as Assistant Professor of Music in Composition-Theory at Brown University.

Tony Arnold, Soprano

“Soprano Tony Arnold is a luminary in the world of chamber music and art song.  Today’s classical composers are inspired by her inherently beautiful voice, consummate musicianship, and embracing spirit” (Huffington Post).  Hailed by the New York Times as “a bold, powerful interpreter,” she is internationally acclaimed as a leading proponent of contemporary music in concert and recording, having premiered hundreds of works by established and emerging composers.  Since becoming the first-prize laureate of both the 2001 Gaudeamus International Competition (NL) and the 2001 Louise D. McMahon Competition (USA), Tony Arnold has collaborated with the most cutting-edge composers and instrumentalists on the world stage and shares with audiences her “broader gift for conveying the poetry and nuance behind outwardly daunting contemporary scores” (Boston Globe).  Her unique blend of vocal virtuosity and communicative warmth, combined with wide-ranging skills in education and leadership were recognized with the 2015 Brandeis Creative Arts Award, given in appreciation of “excellence in the arts and the lives and works of distinguished, active American artists.”

William Sharp, Baritone

Praised by the critic of the New York Times as a “sensitive and subtle singer” who is able to evoke “the special character of every song that he sings,” baritone William Sharp continues to garner critical acclaim for his work in concerts, recitals, operas and recordings. In the summer of 2019, he sang Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater with American Bach Soloists, a recital of Schoenberg and Weill at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and a recital of Farwell songs in a return to the Washington National Cathedral. Among Mr. Sharp’s engagements in the 2019-20 season are Bach’s St. John Passion with Tafelmusik.

Molly Morkoski, Pianist

Pianist Molly Morkoski has performed as soloist and collaborative artist throughout the U.S., Europe, the Caribbean, and Japan. Her playing has been recognized by the New York Times as “strong, profiled, nuanced… beautifully etched…  an energetic and focused player…  with flexibility and warmth…,” and the Boston Globe called her “outstanding.” In 2007, she made her solo debut in Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage playing Beethoven’s Bagatelles, Op. 126. As a soloist, she enjoys championing the classics, such as Bach’s Goldberg Variations and contemporary masterworks such as Ives’ Concord Sonata and Messiaen’s Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus, as well as premiering new works of current composer colleagues, such as John Harbison, Steven Mackey, and Gabriela Lena Frank. Molly Morkoski has performed in many of the country’s prestigious venues, including Weill and Zankel Halls, Alice Tully Hall, Merkin Hall, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Boston’s Gardner Museum and Jordan Hall, St. Louis’ Powell Hall, Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center, and Washington D.C.’s Smithsonian. Internationally, she has performed at the Teatro Nacional in Santo Domingo, the Strasbourg Conservatoire, the U.S. Embassies in Paris and Nice, and in Japan’s Suntory Hall. She has performed concertos with the Raleigh, Asheville, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Tuscaloosa Symphonies, and with the Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra. 

arts night plus

Amherst Arts Night Plus Open Mic with Cameron Awkward-Rich, October 3, 2019

Join us at the Emily Dickinson Museum during Amherst Arts Night Plus on October 3, 2019 for our monthly open mic and pop-up contemporary art exhibit! Poets, writers, performers, and art appreciators of all kinds are welcome! Come early to view the art exhibition in the Homestead by our featured artist. The open mic begins at 6:00 p.m. and will be followed by this month’s featured reader. Those who would like to share their work during the open mic should arrive between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. to sign up.

Views expressed by poets, artists and open mic participants are their own and not the Emily Dickinson Museum’s. Arts Night programming may contain sensitive material.

FEATURED READER

Picture of Cameron Awkward Rich

Cameron Awkward-Rich is the author of Sympathetic Little Monster (Ricochet Editions, 2016), which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, and Dispatch (Persea Books, 2019). A black/trans poet and critic, his work can be found in American Poetry Review, The Baffler, Narrative, Signs, American Quarterly, and elsewhere.

Cameron is a Cave Canem fellow, a poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine, and an assistant professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. 

 

FEATURED ARTIST

Chrissy Howland was born in Baltimore, Maryland and received her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2012.  She has held solo and group exhibitions in Paris, Italy, and Maryland.  Howland seeks to recreate the archetype of the female artist/academic/intellectual as a positive icon without a major association to neurosis, mental illness, and romantic love. She seeks to reinterpret the autobiographical narrative and present a new position for these women within the pop culture canon. Her work aims to dismantle the notion of romanticized pain and female hysteria while creating and maintaining an elevated position and renewed reputation for female artists as women who are powerful, creative, and influential.

FEATURED MUSICIANS

The Jazz Mesmerizers will perform at 5:30 p.m.

Tom Williams, guitarTom is a multi-instrumentalist who holds a degree in Jazz Studies from the University of Arizona. Upon graduation, he furthered his studies at the Frank Rumoro Jazz Guitar Academy in Chicago. He has played in jazz, rock, and country music ensembles for the past thirty-five years. Tom also gives private music lessons for guitar, piano, bass (upright and electric), ukulele, and voice.
 
Pete Sikowitz, bass.  Pete started playing bass violin and Fender bass at age fourteen. While attending Hampshire College, he connected with a group of jazz musicians where he became entranced by the music of such artists as John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, and Miles Davis. After taking a hiatus from music to pursue a New York publishing career, Pete returned to the Pioneer Valley in 2016 to focus on music full time. He also plays guitar and lap steel guitar in Flathead Rodeo, Western New England’s foremost rockabilly/roots band, where he slips extended chords in where he can.