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Events & News
Events & News

See what’s happening! Discussion groups, reading series, story projects, and more.

Reading Series
Phosphorescence

Poetry Reading Series
Every last Thursday each month

Visit
Visit

The Homestead and Evergreens are currently closed to the public.

Restoration Project
Restoration Project

The Emily Dickinson Museum is embarking on the most significant restoration project to date of the revered poet’s Homestead.

Virtual Programming
Virtual Programming

See online exhibits and join us for virtual events.

Support
Support

With your support, the Emily Dickinson Museum has become the essential place for study, work, and play in the Dickinson world.

Education
Education

Sparking an interest in Emily Dickinson’s life and work among learners of all ages is central to the Museum’s mission.

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Directions & Parking

The Museum is two blocks east of Amherst Center on 280 Main Street.

Emily Dickinson Museum
280 Main Street
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002
413-542-8161

Map showing the Homestead at 280 Main Street, Amherst MA

Go to Google Maps »


Driving Directions

From Interstate 91:

Take exit 19 (if coming from the south) or exit 20 (if coming from the north) to Route 9 east. Take Route 9 east approximately five miles through Hadley to the Amherst town limit. Proceed up a long hill. At top of hill, turn left at traffic light onto South Pleasant Street. Turn right at next light onto Main Street. The Museum is 3/10 of a mile ahead on the left.

From the Boston area:

Take Massachusetts Turnpike to Exit 8 (Palmer/Ware). Take Route 32 South to Route 20 West/N Main St. in Palmer. North Main St. becomes MA-181. Follow MA-181 North for 6 miles into Belchertown. Turn left onto Route 9 West and follow into Amherst. After entering Amherst, look for a railroad overpass. Go under the overpass and make an immediate right onto Dickinson Street. Travel two blocks to the end of the street. At the traffic light, turn left onto Main Street. The Museum is ahead on the right.

OR

Take Route 2 West to Exit 16 for Route 202 South. Take Route 202 South about 15 or 20 miles, until you enter Pelham. At an intersection with flashing yellow lights, turn right onto Amherst Road (Amherst Road will eventually turn into Main Street). Go through two traffic lights. The Museum is just ahead on the right after the second traffic light.

Public Transportation

The Emily Dickinson Museum is accessible via public transportation, and a PVTA bus stop is located near the West corner of the Evergreen’s property. Learn more about available options.

Parking

Please note that the Museum driveway is for dropping off passengers and for accessible parking only. All vehicles must park either at meters (many are available directly in front of the Homestead and Evergreens), in an Amherst town parking lot, located on the south side of Main Street two blocks west of the Museum, or in the town parking garage on the north side of Main Street two blocks west of the Museum.

The Town of Amherst’s interactive parking map offers details about nearby parking options.

Group of people standing in a garden on the grounds of the museum

2018 Gardener Sessions with Marta McDowell

Three seasons in the Museum gardens with Marta McDowell

Garden historian Marta McDowell is a familiar face to participants of the Museum’s annual Garden Days. The Emily Dickinson’s Gardens author will have an even bigger presence at the Museum throughout 2018 as our gardener-in-residence. Marta will lead five garden sessions this year, with a different theme for each session. Each session includes public talks and workshops, and volunteer gardening opportunities. Stay tuned for information on public programs and volunteer days in this series! Read more

Two volunteers dig in the garden at the Emily Dickinson Museum

UMASS Summer Field School in Historical Archaeology

May 29 – June 30

In 2018 Archaeological Services at the University of Massachusetts will again offer a Summer Field School in Historical Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum, home of the renowned poet in Amherst, Massachusetts. Students will learn and practice the fundamental skills of archaeological field and laboratory research under the direction of both academically oriented archaeologists and experienced cultural resource management professionals.Read more

Poet reading at a microphone in the museum

Amherst Arts Night at the Emily Dickinson Museum

Poet reading at a microphone in the museumJune 7, 2018

On first Thursdays of each month, see a pop-up art exhibition in the Homestead, participate in an open mic in Emily Dickinson’s parlor, and listen to featured readers share their written work.

The Emily Dickinson Museum participates in Amherst Arts Night Plus on first Thursdays each month. Free and open to all! Each month, enjoy the following:

  • Pop-up contemporary art exhibit in the Homestead from 5 to 8 pm
  • Open mic signups from 5 to 6 pm, with the open mic beginning at 6 pm
  • Featured readers follow the open mic

About guest artists at the Emily Dickinson Museum: Please note that the works of guest artists may contain sensitive or mature material and do not necessarily represent the views of the Emily Dickinson Museum.

June 7, 2018 Arts Night Plus

Wyn Cooper portraitWyn Cooper has published five book of poems, most recently Mars Poetica. His work has appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, Slate, and more than 100 other magazines as well as in 25 anthologies of contemporary poetry. His poems have been turned into songs by Sheryl Crow, David Broza, and Madison Smartt Bell. He has taught and given readings throughout the United States as well as in Europe. He lives in Boston and works as a freelance editor.

There’s a certain Slant of light (258)

There’s a certain Slant of light,
Winter Afternoons –
That oppresses, like the Heft
Of Cathedral Tunes –

Heavenly Hurt, it gives us –
We can find no scar,
But internal difference,
Where the Meanings, are –

None may teach it – Any –
‘Tis the Seal Despair –
An imperial affliction
Sent us of the Air –Read more