poetry discussion group

Virtual Poetry Discussion Group, January 15 & 22

The Emily Dickinson Museum’s Poetry Discussion Group meets monthly, September through May, for lively conversation about Emily Dickinson’s poetry and letters.

 

Join us from 1pm to 2:30pm on Zoom for a discussion on January 15 or January 22. Space is limited. To request a space, please complete this google form. For questions, please write edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

This program is free of charge, but we encourage those who are able to do so to make a donation after the program.

Topic: Title: “Nerve in Marble: the Geology of Emily Dickinson’s Poetry”   
Amanda Lowe’s work on Emily Dickinson interprets the processes of geothermal activity and rock metamorphosis as central to Dickinson’s poetic forms. This discussion invites participants to explore a collection of Dickinson’s poems that use images of volcanoes, granite and marble to explore the effects of human emotion on the body. We’ll discuss the development of geologic inquiry during the nineteenth century, Dickinson’s education in it, and suggest ways these theories seeped into her poetry. Through speakers’ depictions of highly alive and dead bodies, we’ll look together at the profound impact geology had on Dickinson’s understanding of the human relationship to the natural world.

About the Facilitator
Amanda Lowe is a PhD Candidate at Columbia University who researches the presence of geologic theory in nineteenth century American Literature. She is a current SOF/Heyman Center Public Humanities Fellow and the Graduate Student Coordinator for the Freedom and Citizenship Program. 

Emily Dickinson's white dress on a stand in her bedroom

“A Mighty Room” Virtual Studio Session: Bedroom, January 29, 12-1pm

Sweet hours have perished here;

This is a mighty room;

Within its precincts hopes have played, —

Now shadows in the tomb.  

-J1767 

 

 

Spend a “sweet hour” in Emily Dickinson’s creative space where she penned her startling poetry. Whether you are a writer, an artist, a composer, or a poet, you’ll find solace and inspiration for your artistic output in Emily Dickinson’s bedroom. Let this quiet virtual experience jumpstart your next creative journey. 

What to expect: As one of a limited number of remote participants, you will need to find a quiet spot with a good internet connection from which to be immersed in a live feed from the poet’s bedroom in the Dickinson family Homestead. Plan to have your camera and audio on. In this room Dickinson found freedom working up late by lamplight. A facilitator in the room welcomes you and gently guides you through three inspirational writing prompts to help you explore this unique physical and psychic space and unleash your own creativity over the course of the hour. Focused on reflection and quietude, this program is not a writing workshop, but you will have the opportunity at the end for a short share-out with the group if you wish. 

Space is limited for this program and you may be added to a waitlist. To sign up please click this link to visit our registration form.

This program is free to participate, but your donation helps the Museum to continue providing free programs! Participants will be invited to make an online donation after the program.

“Phosphorescence” Poetry Reading Series

decorative

Article Photo | The Emily Dickinson Museum | Eleanor Glewwe

The Emily Dickinson Museum is now accepting proposals for our “Phosphorescence” Poetry Reading Series, A VIRTUAL EVENT held monthly throughout 2021! 

“PHOSPHORESCENCE. Now there’s a word to lift your hat to… to find that phosphorescence, that light within, that’s the genius behind poetry.” – Emily Dickinson

Produced by the Emily Dickinson Museum, the aim of “Phosphorescence” is to celebrate contemporary creativity that echoes Dickinson’s revolutionary poetic voices. The Series features and serves established and emerging poets and their readers who represent the diversity of the flourishing contemporary American poetry scene, and fosters community by placing poetry in the public sphere. The 2021 Series will be a virtual event to ensure the health and safety of participants. While we are disappointed not to gather together in Amherst, we are excited to connect with a wider community of friends and writers. During this time, we call on you to help us carry on Dickinson’s legacy of creating community and sparking the imagination as we shelter in place.

Featured poets are promoted on the Museum’s event web page, through an event mailing list of roughly 15,000 addresses, and through the Museum’s social media. Each participating poet receives a $200 honorarium.

READINGS:
This program occurs at 6:30PM EST on the last Thursday of each month. Each reading may feature 1-4 poets. Readings are 15-25 minutes long on average, though this may depend on other program components each month. Poets who submit alone may be paired with other poets if selected. Published authors are welcome to promote sales of their books on the evening of the program. Poets should be prepared to engage in facilitated conversation and/or a Q&A after their readings.

Emily Dickinson Stamp National Postal MuseumSUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Only submissions made using our online form will be considered.
There is no fee to submit proposals.
Group submissions from up to 4 poets are accepted.

Special consideration will be given in selection to:
Submissions that engage young attendees and those new to poetry
Submissions that build community
Submissions that support/showcase BIPOC and/or LBGTQ voices
Submissions that highlight a connection to Dickinson’s life and legacy

SUBMISSIONS DUE: Wednesday, February 3, 2021, 12:00 pm EST.

To submit a proposal please click this link for our submission form.

TIMELINE
Accepted submissions will be notified by the end of February. Participating poets will be asked to sign a form of agreement confirming participation on assigned dates. Submissions may also be considered for the 2022 series.

 

 

 

pencil and fascicle

“A Mighty Room” Virtual Studio Session: Library, February 5, 12-1pm

A bookshelf in the Homestead library

A Homestead library bookshelf

Sweet hours have perished here;

This is a mighty room;

Within its precincts hopes have played, —

Now shadows in the tomb.  

-J1767 

Spend a “sweet hour” in Emily Dickinson’s creative space where she penned her startling poetry. Whether you are a writer, an artist, a composer, or a poet, you’ll find solace and inspiration for your artistic output in Emily Dickinson’s library. Let this quiet virtual experience jumpstart your next creative journey. 

What to expect: As one of a limited number of participants, you will need to find a quiet spot with a good internet connection from which to be immersed in a live feed from the library of Emily Dickinson’s Homestead. Plan to have your camera and audio on. In this room were gathered Dickinson’s favorite books, her “Kinsmen of the Shelves” that “carried her to lands away.” A facilitator in the room welcomes you and gently guides you through three inspirational writing prompts to help you explore this unique physical and psychic space and unleash your own creativity over the course of the hour. Focused on reflection and quietude, this program is not a writing workshop, but you will have the opportunity at the end for a short share-out with the group if you wish. 

Space is limited for this program and you may be added to a waitlist. To register for this program, click here.

This program is free to participate, but your donation helps the Museum to continue providing free programs! Participants will be invited to make an online donation after the program.

Color-By-Numbers Craft

Color your own Emily Dickinson portrait by paint, crayon, or any media you can get your hands on!
Download here

Share your creation by tagging us on Facebook (@emily.dickinson.museum), Instagram (@emilydickinson.museum), or Twitter (@DickinsonMuseum).

 

Emily Dickinson's white dress on a stand in her bedroom

“A Mighty Room” Studio Session: Bedroom, December 18, 12-1p.m.

Emily's bedroom with her dress and bed and writing tableSweet hours have perished here;

This is a mighty room;

Within its precincts hopes have played, —

Now shadows in the tomb.  

-J1767 

 

 

Spend a “sweet hour” in Emily Dickinson’s creative space where she penned her startling poetry. Whether you are a writer, an artist, a composer, or a poet, you’ll find solace and inspiration for your artistic output in Emily Dickinson’s bedroom. Let this quiet virtual experience jumpstart your next creative journey. 

What to expect: As one of a limited number of participants, you will need to find a quiet spot with a good internet connection from which to be immersed in a live feed from the poet’s bedroom in the Dickinson family Homestead. Plan to have your camera and audio on. In this room Dickinson found freedom working up late by lamplight. A facilitator in the room welcomes you and gently guides you through three inspirational writing prompts to help you explore this unique physical and psychic space and unleash your own creativity over the course of the hour. Focused on reflection and quietude, this program is not a writing workshop, but you will have the opportunity at the end for a short share-out with the group if you wish. 

Space is limited for this program and you may be added to a waitlist. To sign up please click this link to visit our registration form.

This program is free to participate, but your donation helps the Museum to continue providing free programs! Participants will be invited to make an online donation after the program.

A photo taken from the perspective of a cemetery in Bosnian, featuring rolling, misty hills on a thickly cloudy day; In the foreground is a seemingly endless expanse of field. The whole photo is in tones of deep yellows, greens and blacks.

Photography by Ivana Kovačević

A photo taken from the perspective of a cemetery in Bosnian, featuring rolling, misty hills on a thickly cloudy day; In the foreground is a seemingly endless expanse of field. The whole photo is in tones of deep yellows, greens and blacks.

The Carriage Held but just Ourselves – And Immortality.

Photography, Ivana Kovačević

Instagram: @tristram.and.shandy

 

Featured as part of Emilytober2020 with permission from the artist

Framing the opening stanza of Emily Dickinson's "It's all I have to bring today" (F17) is a beautiful watercolor illustration on an orange-toned background. Above the poem are an owl, a porcupine, and a chipmunk carrying different kinds of seeds, and to the right of the poem stanza is a little African American girl in a green dress with her hair pulled back in a green ribbon, carrying a pumpkin

Art by Olivia Coucci

Framing the opening stanza of Emily Dickinson's "It's all I have to bring today" (F17) is a beautiful watercolor illustration on an orange-toned background. Above the poem are an owl, a porcupine, and a chipmunk carrying different kinds of seeds, and to the right of the poem stanza is a little African American girl in a green dress with her hair pulled back in a green ribbon, carrying a pumpkin

Art by Olivia Coucci

Inspired by Emily Dickinson poem F17, 2020

Instagram: @theartfulolive

Featured as part of Emilytober2020 with permission from the artist

A black ink drawing of Emily Dickinson, in the style of her famous daguerreotype

Art by Linda Simionato

A black ink drawing of Emily Dickinson, in the style of her famous daguerreotype

Art by Linda Simionato

Ink and paper, 2020

Instagram: @lindaillustrazioni and @lindasimionato23
Facebook: @linda.simionato23

 

Featured as part of Emilytober2020 with permission from the artist

Black ink on sepia toned paper, this is a drawing of Emily Dickinson posing with a knowing smirk, holding a mouse by the thumb and forefinger of her right hand and with an enormous, mohawked bird perched on her left forearm

Art by Melinda Narro

Black ink on sepia toned paper, this is a drawing of Emily Dickinson posing with a knowing smirk, holding a mouse by the thumb and forefinger of her right hand and with an enormous, mohawked bird perched on her left forearm

Hope

Ink, Melinda Narro, 2020

Instagram: @mknarro13

 

Featured as part of Emilytober2020 with permission from the artist