graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival program: Does Translation Tell It Slant?

Does Translation ‘Tell It Slant’?
Translators on Process

Sunday, Sept. 25, 11am ET

In-Person Program

graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival program: Does Translation Tell It Slant?

Part of the 2022 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival

Does the translation of a poem “tell it slant”? Do translators aim to tell the truth, but not the whole truth? What truths are uncovered when poems are given a new language? Do translators who are fluent in the language “uncover,” while those who may be just learning “discover”? In this session, panelists speak about their process of translating poetry and their relationship with truth-making, as well as read from their recently published translations. This program is brought to you by Festival partner, Massachusetts Center for the Book.

REGISTER FOR THE FESTIVAL


About the poets:

Danielle Legros Georges is a creative and critical writer, translator, and academic whose work sits in the fields of contemporary U.S. poetry, Black and African-diasporic poetry and literature, Caribbean/Latin American and Haitian studies, and literary translation. She is the author of several books of poetry including Maroon (2001), The Dear Remote Nearness of You (2016), and Island Heart (2021) translations of the poems of 20th-century Haitian-French poet Ida Faubert. Her poems have been widely published, anthologized, and contained in artistic commissions and collaborations. She was appointed Poet Laureate of Boston in 2014 and served in the role from 2015 through 2019. She is a professor of creative writing at Lesley University.

Ilan Stavans‘ book Selected Translations: Poems 2000-2020 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021) features about 100 translations he did over two decades from about 20 different languages, including languages he doesn’t know. Emily Dickinson’s line “Tell it slant” serves as the volume’s epigraph; there are also poems by her included that he translated into Spanish. His conviction is that translation is a process whereby a poem is “reborn” in a new habitat and that such rebirth forces us to recalibrate the way we read the original poem as well.

Dr. Regina Galasso is a writer, translator, and educator. Her award-winning scholarly work highlights the role of translation in literary histories and contemporary culture. Her forthcoming publications include This Is a Classic: Translators on Making Writers Global. She creates and supports ways to promote translation education to encourage greater understanding of this needed service and intellectual activity. With her students, she curated the 2022 exhibition “Read the World: Picture Books and Translation” for the Reading Library at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. She works with school districts to improve their language access services and initiatives. She is Director of the Translation Center and Associate Professor in the Spanish and Portuguese Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and can be reached at rgalasso@umass.edu.


Support The Tell It Slant Poetry Festival and Honor Someone Special:
Admission to all Festival events is free, but online donations, especially those made in honor or memory of family, friends, or colleagues are heartily encouraged and vital to the future of this beloved annual event. All gifts are tax deductible and will be recognized as part of the Festival.


2022 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival Schedule

Circular image of the Earth with Emily's handwriting overlaid atop

Emily Dickinson International Society
Annual Meeting
July 21-23, 2023

IN-PERSON PROGRAM

This program is jointly presented by the Emily Dickinson International Society. Registration is required. 
Please address any questions about the Annual Meeting to edismeeting@emilydickinsonmuseum.org

REGISTER

Poster for Emily Dickinson International Society theme "Clasp Hemispheres, and Homes"The Emily Dickinson International Society (EDIS) is returning to Amherst! For the last three summers, while EDIS has gathered online and in Seville, the Emily Dickinson Museum was closed. The Museum used the time to undertake a major, impeccably researched and executed restoration of the Dickinson Homestead; they also launched the first comprehensive cataloging of the Museum’s collection of over 10,000 objects. The EDIS Annual Meeting will feature this work. Participants will be able to tour the magnificently restored Homestead, learn about the restoration from museum staff, and view objects relating to Dickinson’s home from the Museum’s collection that have never been exhibited. 

The conference theme, “Clasp Hemispheres, and Homes,” comes from Dickinson’s poem “The Sunrise runs for Both – ” (M 355, Fr765, J710). In congruence with Dickinson’s “Both” 16 panels with nearly 50 presentations will delve into the relation between Dickinson’s mental and material interiors and her expansive embrace of wider, external spheres. Special events will include the screening of two recent Dickinson Opera films: Lesley Dill’s capacious  Divide Light (2020) and Dana Kaufman’s intimate Emily & Sue (2022). In addition to performances and panel presentations, the meeting will include special interest circles on research, pedagogy, translation, and the arts. Join the Emily Dickinson International Society in Amherst to celebrate Dickinson’s work and the vibrant community she inspires.

All attendees of the annual meeting must be members of the Emily Dickinson International Society. The Annual Meeting regular registration fee of $175 and student/financial need registration fee of $125 includes tours of the Dickinson Homestead, Opera film screenings, refreshments, two lunches, and the Saturday Meeting Picnic-Banquet. There are no additional costs for these Annual Meeting events.

FULL PROGRAM OF EVENTS

A block of rooms has been reserved for the Annual Meeting at The Inn on Boltwood (an elegant inn walking distance from campus). Call 413-256-8200 and mention code EDIS 2023 to reserve your room at the EDIS discounted rate, the block is being held until June 2nd.

The Annual Meeting is being held at Amherst College and the college website provides a large list of local Hotels and of Bed & Breakfasts as well as Travel Information and Driving Directions.

Address any questions about the Critical Institute and Annual Meeting to edismeeting@emilydickinsonmuseum.org

 

graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival program: Dickinsonian Death-Conscious Exclamation Point

The Dickinsonian [Death-Conscious]
Exclamation Point! A Workshop

Sunday, Sept. 25, 11am ET

Virtual Program

graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival program: Dickinsonian Death-Conscious Exclamation Point

Part of the 2022 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival

Elmore Leonard famously suggested that writers use 1-2 exclamation points per 100,000 words of writing. Theodor Adorno called the exclamation point “intolerable.” Emily Dickinson used around 384 exclamation points in her collected work, and her wielding of this controversial mark has provided an exemplary model of how poets might add a note of ecstasy and death-consciousness into their writing. In this workshop, we will begin by discussing three primary modes in which exclamation points appear in contemporary poetry and then segue into a series of light-hearted and serious writing exercises centered around this piece of punctuation.

REGISTER FOR THE FESTIVAL


About the poet:

Moriel Rothman-Zecher is the author of the novels Sadness Is a White Bird (Atria, 2018) for which he received the National Book Foundation’s ‘5 Under 35’ Honor, and Before All the World, which will be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on October 11, 2022. His poetry and essays have been published or are forthcoming in Barrelhouse, Colorado Review, The Common, The New York Times, The Paris Review’s Daily, Zyzzyva and elsewhere, and he is the recipient of two MacDowell Fellowships for Literature, and a Bennington Writing Seminars Donald Hall Scholarship for Poets.


Support The Tell It Slant Poetry Festival and Honor Someone Special:
Admission to all Festival events is free, but online donations, especially those made in honor or memory of family, friends, or colleagues are heartily encouraged and vital to the future of this beloved annual event. All gifts are tax deductible and will be recognized as part of the Festival.


2022 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival Schedule

Annual Poetry Walk 2022
Saturday, May 14, 11:30am ET

VIRTUAL PROGRAM

This virtual program is free to attend. Registration is required. 

REGISTER

REGISTER WITH DONATION

Dickinson's tombstone covered in daisies

Days before her death in 1886, Emily Dickinson wrote her final letter, “Little Cousins, / Called Back. / Emily”. On May 14, in honor of the 136th anniversary of the poet’s death, join the Emily Dickinson Museum for an engaging virtual poetry reading and “walk” through Amherst, the town she called “paradise.”  At each stop we will explore sites of meaning for Dickinson including her garden and conservatory at the Homestead, The Evergreens — home to the poet’s brother and sister-in-law, the town common, Amherst College, and more.  Not a lecture, this program infuses place with poetry. At each stop volunteers read Dickinson’s own words aloud. The final stop is Dickinson’s grave in West Cemetery where we will share reflections and a light-hearted virtual toast! 

Registration for this program is free or by donation, but it is required in advance.


a boy places a daisy on Dickinson's graveA Daisy for Dickinson: Be a part of a beloved tradition of outfitting Emily Dickinson’s final resting place at Amherst’s West Cemetery with fresh daisies on the anniversary of her death.  Make a supporting donation to the Museum in honor of Emily or in memory of someone you’ve loved and lost, and we’ll place a daisy in their name at the poet’s grave as part of this year’s Poetry Walk (May 14).

We hope you enjoyed this beloved tradition of honoring Emily Dickinson on the anniversary of her death. If you would like to make a supporting gift to the Museum in honor of Emily or in memory of someone you’ve loved and lost, you may do so below.

DONATE

 

 

 

 

 

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Twice as Bold Campaign

I took my Power in my Hand –
And went against the World –
’Twas not so much as David – had –
But I – was twice as bold –
(excerpt Fr660)

We invite you to be part of the Twice as Bold initiative by making a gift to the Museum in support of its program and core mission, in celebration of the 20th Anniversary, and in honor of Emily Dickinson and her enduring relevance.

DONATE

The Homestead garden. There are beautiful pink roses wrapping around a trellis.

During the Emily Dickinson Museum’s two-year closure, we opened a new chapter focused on the Museum’s evolving role as a site of unparalleled cultural significance and educational promise emanating from its mission to spark the imagination by amplifying Emily Dickinson’s revolutionary poetic voice from the place she called home. 

To fully realize and sustain this mission, the Museum has created a long range plan that empowers it to serve as the premier center for study, interpretation, creative expression, and celebration of Emily Dickinson’s life and legacy — to be “twice as bold.” Emily Dickinson’s worldwide resonance and the Museum’s tremendous growth in audience during the pandemic, demonstrates a clear path forward.

This new chapter and campaign, called Twice as Bold, prioritizes an expanded, fully restored, and accessible campus, leading-edge educational programs and resources, a singular visitor experience both onsite and online, and increased operational capacity for the Museum’s long-term sustainability. A first step in achieving this bold vision is a goal to raise $8 million for programmatic support and capital projects and $5.5 million in endowment by 2026.

The Emily Dickinson Museum is grateful to John and Elizabeth Armstrong and to Jane and Robert Keiter for leading the way in the Twice as Bold campaign. The Armstrongs’ kick-off challenge gift initiated in 2021 allowed the Museum to begin work on reconstructing The Evergreens’ Carriage House–critical space, first, for welcoming visitors, and ultimately for educational programming. And the Keiters’ endowment of the Museum’s directorship in 2022 has provided perpetual and budget-relieving support of the Museum’s core program and operating budget.

We invite you to be part of the Museum’s journey and the Twice as Bold campaign by making a gift to the Museum in support of its program and core mission support, in celebration of our 20th Anniversary, and in honor of Emily Dickinson and her enduring relevance. Additional funding opportunities are also available. Please contact Nora Maroulis, Senior Director of Development and Communications at nmaroulis@EmilyDickinsonMuseum.org or 413-542-5072.


FUNDING NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES                      

$8 Million in Outright Support and $5.5 Million in Endowment

  • Create an expanded, restored, and accessible campus
  • Develop and deliver leading-edge public and educational programs and resources
  • Design and provide a singular visitor experience both onsite and online  
  • Build permanent ongoing support for the Museum’s core programs and operations                                                                                                                                                

Five-Year Funding Needs and Opportunities 

Opportunities abound for donors at all levels to positively impact and help shape the Museum’s bright future. Priority projects and programs in need of investment and support over the next five years are framed by the Museum’s essential mission. Gifts or bequests of unrestricted endowment are most welcome, as they provide critical support to each and all of these areas.


SPARK THE IMAGINATION         $1.9M

Audience Engagement and Communication $650K
Two children explore Dickinson's bedroomDigital Capacity and Resource Development ($200K)
Virtual Program Hosting and Conferencing Upgrades ($100K)
Website Accessibility and User-Experience Updates ($50K)
New CRM (Constituent Relationship Management) System ($150K)
Graphic Identity / Branding Updates ($150K)

Teaching and Learning (K-12, College/University, Lifelong) $1.25M
Resource Development (curricula, teacher training modules, etc.) ($550K)
Undergraduate Internships and Graduate Fellowships ($275K)
Honoraria for Visiting and Teaching Artists, Writers, Scholars ($190K)
Scholarships for Visiting K-12 Schools and Teacher Training ($95K)
Poets and Writers Workshops and Classes (FY23+) ($140K)


AMPLIFY EMILY DICKINSON’S REVOLUTIONARY POETIC VOICE           $2.6M

Interpretation and Visitor Experience $800K

image of Youtube pageThematic Tour Development ($330K)
Self-Guided Map and Interactive Guide ($85K)
Orientation Film ($300K)
Wayfinding ($85K)

Public Programs and Events $1.8M
Poetry Programs $540K

Poetry Festival and Marathon  ($315K)
Phosphorescence Contemporary Poetry Series ($135K)
Poetry Discussion Groups ($90K)

Collections, Restoration, Landscape, and History Programs $270K
Dickinson Book Club Series ($90K)
Buildings, Grounds and Collections Presentations ($90K)
Behind the Scenes Collections / Restoration Series ($90K)

Community-Building Events $450K
Birthday Celebration ($30K)
Poetry Walk ($25K)
Reopening Events and Launch of Dickinson Days ($150K)
Tell It Slant Awards / 20th Anniversary Gala ($245K)

Visual and Performing Art Programs $540K
Dickinson in Performance Series ($135K)
Conservatory and Landscape Installations ($270K)
Dickinson in the World Podcast ($135K)



FROM THE PLACE SHE CALLED HOME                         $3.5M

Completion of Homestead Restoration $1.0MRendering of the Dickinson barn
Design Development ($150K)
Construction / Restoration ($700K)
Decorative Arts and Object Conservation ($150K)

Rebuild Evergreens Carriage House $600K
Design Development ($100K)
Construction ($400K)
Furnishings and Fittings ($100K)

Conserve and Restore The Evergreens $1.0M
Interior Conditions Assessment ($50K)
Treatment Plan Development ($100K)
Conservation and Restoration ($700K)
Decorative Arts and Object Conservation ($150K)

Restore Landscape and Dickinson Gardens $400K
Homestead Gardens restoration ($200K)
Evergreens Gardens restoration ($75K)
Other Landscape restoration ($125K)

Collections Stewardship $500K
Collections Rehousing ($400K)
Conservation ($100K)


ENDOWMENT FOR CORE PROGRAM AND OPERATIONS          $5.5M

By providing budget relieving support in perpetuity, endowment gifts in support of core program and operating expenses allow the Museum to sustain and deliver its mission long-term.

Figures are for annual cost over 5 years. Endowment gifts intended to name and/or directly support a specific project or program must cover 60% of associated costs. 

the Homestead lights are on at night time

Call for Submissions:
Phosphorescence Poetry Reading Series 2023

The 2023 Phosphorescence Poetry Reading Series schedule will be announced soon! 
Sign-up for our e-newsletter to be the first to know

The Emily Dickinson Museum is now accepting proposals for the 3rd year of our Phosphorescence Poetry Reading Series — a virtual event held monthly from May-October in 2023! This year, opportunities for reading on-site at the Emily Dickinson Museum and remotely will be available. Please make sure to select your preference in the submission form.

Produced by the Emily Dickinson Museum, the aim of Phosphorescence is to celebrate contemporary creativity that echoes Dickinson’s revolutionary poetic voice. The Series features established and emerging poets who represent the diversity of the flourishing contemporary poetry scene, and fosters community through poetry. The Series is a place to connect virtually over a shared love of language and an appreciation for Dickinson’s literary legacy.

Featured poets are promoted on the Museum’s event web page, through an event mailing list of roughly 18,000 addresses, and through the Museum’s social media. Each participating poet receives a $200 honorarium.

READINGS:
This program occurs at 6pm ET on a Thursday each month. Each reading may feature 1-3 poets. Readings are 15-25 minutes long on average per reader, though this may depend on other program components each month. Group submissions are strongly encouraged. Poets who submit alone will be paired with other poets if selected. Poets are welcome to promote sales of their books, and/or awareness of other media on the evening of the program. Poets should be prepared to engage in facilitated conversation and/or a Q&A after their readings on subjects including inspiration, craft, and Emily Dickinson.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Only submissions made using our online form and Dropbox folder will be considered. We will not accept email or paper submissions.
There is no fee to submit proposals.
Group submissions from up to 3 poets are accepted.

The following submission qualities are especially encouraged:

  • builds community
  • features BIPOC and/or LBGTQ+ voices
  • highlights a connection to Dickinson’s life and legacy
  • pushes poetic boundaries

SUBMISSIONS DUE: Sunday, February 12, 2023, 12pm ET.

TIMELINE
All submissions will be notified of their acceptance status by early April. Participating poets will be asked to sign a letter of agreement confirming participation on assigned dates.


View last year’s Phosphorescence Schedule

Watch Phosphorescence on Youtube

 

The cast of Apple TV's Dickinson in the parlor wearing Shakespearean costumes and florals

Dickinson’s 191st Birthday Celebration
Friday, December 10, 12pm ET

VIRTUAL PROGRAM
The cast of Apple TV's Dickinson in the parlor wearing Shakespearean costumes and florals

Image courtesy of Apple TV

REGISTER FOR THIS PROGRAM FOR FREE
or 
REGISTER FOR THIS PROGRAM WITH A DONATION

You are cordially invited to the Emily Dickinson Museum’s virtual celebration of the poet’s 191st birthday! On Friday, December 10, join us for an afternoon exploring behind-the-scenes at the Emily Dickinson Museum while we remain closed to the public for our biggest restoration project ever. We will toast to Dickinson’s enduring legacy, and share the ways the Museum is working to preserve her home and story. This program contains sneak-peeks at the new interiors you’ll see when we reopen in spring 2022, and we’ll also be making a BIG ANNOUNCEMENT with our friends over at Apple TV’s Dickinson! We can hardly wait to share it with you!

All are welcome to this free program but registration is required.

Give a Birthday Gift
It’s not a birthday party without gifts! If you’re looking to honor Emily Dickinson with a birthday present, please consider a donation to the Museum to support our free virtual programs which are made possible with your support. Gifts of all sizes are deeply appreciated.

DONATE

A crane lifts a painter up to the top of the Homestead

About Dickinson’s Birthday

Emily Dickinson, the middle child of Edward and Emily Norcross Dickinson, was born on December 10, 1830, in the family Homestead on Main Street in Amherst, Massachusetts. She celebrated 55 birthdays before her death in 1886. As an adult she wrote, “We turn not older with years, but newer every day.” (Johnson L379)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Archival poster for a lecture on "the real Emily Dickinson" given by Martha Dickinson Bianchi

The “Real” Emily Dickinson at 191
Wednesday, December 1, 4:30pm ET

VIRTUAL PROGRAM

Archival poster for a lecture on "the real Emily Dickinson" given by Martha Dickinson Bianchi

An illustrated talk and birthday celebration with Emily Dickinson Museum Director Jane Wald

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER for this free program.

During her lifetime, Emily Dickinson remained solidly and agreeably planted in Amherst—a known but ultimately withdrawn member of one of the town’s leading families, perhaps known better as a baker than as a poet. Following her death in 1886, the poet’s words came to light through the work of posthumous editors who sought to fill in the story for the public. Now, at the 191st anniversary of her birthday, Dickinson’s poetry speaks powerfully to readers all over the world, but her life seems even more contested in the popular imagination than ever before. Can we know “the real Emily Dickinson”? Would she want us to? Would we even want to? 

In this illustrated talk, Emily Dickinson Museum Executive Director Jane Wald evokes these fraught questions and controversies through an exploration of early biographer and editor Martha Dickinson Bianchi at the 100th anniversary of the poet’s birth, tracing interpretations through contemporary creative portrayals of the poet such as AppleTV’s ‘Dickinson’ starring Hailee Steinfeld, and right back to the ongoing preservation and interpretive work at the poet’s home in Amherst, Massachusetts.

This program is presented in partnership with the Amherst College Center for Humanistic Inquiry.

The homestead parlor with 4 windows, a fireplace, two chairs, a rug and a side table.

The Props assist the House:
Restoring the Homestead (Part 3)
Saturday, September 25, 1pm

The homestead parlor with 4 windows, a fireplace, two chairs, a rug and a side table.Part of the 2021 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival:

In the final installment of this three-part series, go behind the scenes of the restoration of Emily Dickinson’s home with Museum Executive Director Jane Wald and special guest Jeff Baker, preservation architect and partner at Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker Architects. The Emily Dickinson Museum is currently embarking on the most significant restoration project to date of the interior architectural features, finishes, and furnishings of the revered poet’s Homestead. This work will not only triple the amount of restored space in the Homestead accessible to guests, but will also add critical details to our understanding of Dickinson’s daily life by providing a more authentic experience of the house she inhabited. In this virtual program, learn how the documentary record yields clues about this historic house and hear first-hand about the research and decisions that go into restoration work. 

REGISTER

 

Headshot of Jeff Baker

Jeff Baker has been with Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker for over thirty years and has been a firm Partner for over twenty years. After his graduation from Hudson Valley Community College, Jeff attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) where he earned a Bachelor’s of Building Science and a Bachelor’s of Architecture. Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker specializes in Architecture, Planning and Historic Preservation, and has overseen the success of several previous restoration projects at the Emily Dickinson Museum, as well as numerous other National Historic Landmarks.

A few examples of Jeff’s work include the restoration of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello in Charlottesville, Virginia; Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest in Lynchburg, Virginia; James Madison’s Montpelier, in Montpelier Station, Virginia; and the Newport Country Club in Newport, Rhode Island. Jeff has also been retained to assist in the restoration of George Washington’s Mount Vernon in Virginia.

Learn more at mcwb-arch.com.

Support The Tell It Slant Poetry Festival and Honor Someone Special:
Admission to all Festival events is free, but online donations, especially those made in honor or memory of family, friends, or colleagues are heartily encouraged and vital to the future of this beloved annual event. All gifts are tax deductible and will be recognized as part of the Festival. 

2021 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival Schedule

 

Graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival 2021 headliner night with headshots of Tracy K. Smith and Tiana Clark with the Tell It Slant logo.

An Evening with Tracy K. Smith and Tiana Clark
Saturday, September 25, 7:30pm

Graphic for Tell It Slant Poetry Festival 2021 headliner night with headshots of Tracy K. Smith and Tiana Clark with the Tell It Slant logo. Part of the 2021 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival:

Settle in for an evening of poetry celebrating Emily Dickinson’s ongoing creative legacy with the work of two internationally acclaimed contemporary female poets. Headliners Tracy K. Smith and Tiana Clark will read from their work and discuss their poetic practice and inspiration. Don’t miss out on this special evening of community through art and conversation that will dazzle you with the necessity of poetry, or in Smith’s words, “a means of living more deeply with reality”.

Live captioning will be available at this event!

REGISTER

 

 

 

 

About the artists:

Headshot of Tracy K. Smith

Tracy K. Smith received the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in poetry for her third book of poems, Life on Mars. Smith served two terms as Poet Laureate of the United States, during which she traveled across America, hosting poetry readings and conversations in rural communities. She edited the anthology American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time during her laureateship, and launched the American Public Media podcast The Slowdown.  In March 2021 she was voted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

 

 

Headshot of Tiana ClarkTiana Clark is the author of the poetry collection, I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018). Clark is a winner for the 2020 Kate Tufts Discovery Award (Claremont Graduate University), a 2019 National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellow, and the 2015 Rattle Poetry Prize. She is a recipient of the 2021-2022 Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship and the 2019 Pushcart Prize. Her writing has appeared in or is forthcoming from The New Yorker, Poetry Magazine, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Virginia Quarterly Review, Tin House Online, Kenyon Review, BuzzFeed News, American Poetry Review, Oxford American, Best New Poets 2015, and elsewhere. She is the Grace Hazard Conkling Writer-in-Residence at Smith College.

 

Support The Tell It Slant Poetry Festival and Honor Someone Special:
Admission to all Festival events is free, but online donations, especially those made in honor or memory of family, friends, or colleagues are heartily encouraged and vital to the future of this beloved annual event. All gifts are tax deductible and will be recognized as part of the Festival. 

2021 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival Schedule