Handmade postcard depicting original print of Dickinson's face

Postcard front:
Let me not mar that perfect dream
By an auroral stain But so adjust my
daily night That it will come again.

35/35  DREAMER  J. Hamilton

Postcard verso:
Happy
Birthday
Emily!
Love,
Jim Hamilton
Marshfield, MA

Virtual Poetry Walk Registration – Closes 12pm May 14

Please use the following form to register for the Virtual Poetry Walk, held May 15, 2020 from 12pm to 1pm EST.
Upon your successful registration, you will receive a thank you message. The Museum will e-mail the program link and any reading assignments to participants by 5pm EST on May 14, 2020.

Registration for this program is closed.

Questions? Please write edmprograms@emilydickinsonmuseum.org

test postcard - a scene in Maine

Test Postcard

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poetry discussion group

Remote Program: Poetry Discussion Group, May 22, 2020

poetry discussion groupThe Emily Dickinson Museum’s Poetry Discussion Group meets monthly, September through May, for lively conversation about Emily Dickinson’s poetry and letters. Each session is facilitated by a guest leader.
Join us for a remote zoom discussion from 12pm to 1:30pm on Friday, May 22. 

Topic: Emily Dickinson and the Mind

Poetry, for Emily Dickinson, is invested with inconceivable possibilities of signification. She reveled in the ecstatic “Madness” of meanings, since, to her, “Much Madness is divinest Sense.”Her forte is to transform the material to the metaphorical, and to question the notion of ‘reality’ as it is conventionally understood.

This session will feature Dickinson and philosophy, spanning her mental philosophy textbooks to parallels between her poetry and the writings of philosopher Immanuel Kant. Dickinson was, like Kant, intrigued with the relation between subject and object, and fascinated with the ‘transcendent’—that goes beyond the boundaries of empirical evidence. Together we will delve into Dickinson’s writing in a way that will allow us to critically appreciate the transcendental depth and autonomy of the poet’s mind.

 Leader: Mousumi Banerjee
Dr. Mousumi Banerjee is an engaged practitioner of the language and its varied manifestations in literature with a flair for research in poetry, the multiple hermeneutic possibilities of which caused her to look at women’s writing and authorial anxiety in her doctoral study that she pursued from Jadavpur University. The voices of women poets from those intellectual edges, that are hitherto identified as the ‘margins’ of literary writing, became the site of her inquiry which led her to publish considerably on the works of supposedly non-canonical women writers. Philosophical writings also enchant her and she looks forward to working on the textuality of such works by various Western thinkers across traditions of thought and practice. She is a passionate teacher in literature and contemporary theory, singer and music enthusiast, and loves to engage in deliberations on other humanistic discourses, in general, and on Emily Dickinson, in particular! She has authored books, named Writing across Genres: Indian Literature, Language and Culture (2015), Daring to Write: The Two Creative Daughters of Victorian England (2015), and Emily Dickinson: Writing as a Woman (2017), and currently has two on-going book-length projects: one on Gitanjali: An Exalted Manifestation of Buddhist Aesthetics, and the other on ‘A thought went up my mind today –’: An Inquiry into a Post-Kantian Transcendental Philosophy in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry. She has been awarded with the Fulbright-Nehru Postdoctoral Research Fellowship 2019-2020 by the United States- India Education Foundation (USIEF) to pursue her postdoctoral research, and presently she is associated with Amherst College for her work on the book on Dickinson. She greatly appreciates the continuous effort of the Emily Dickinson Museum not only in keeping the memory of the poet alive, but also in encouraging thought and scholarship on the poet’s spectacular poetic oeuvre so as to deeply influence our own lives. 

Registration for this event is now closed. If you have registered, we will email you by Monday, May 18 with a link and more information.
Thank you for your interest in this program. If you were not able to join us this time, we hope to see you when the series resumes in September.

A narrow Fellow in the Grass (1096)

A narrow Fellow in the Grass
Occasionally rides – 
You may have met him? Did you not
His notice instant is – 

The Grass divides as with a Comb – 
A spotted Shaft is seen,
And then it closes at your Feet
And opens further on – 

He likes a Boggy Acre – 
A Floor too cool for Corn – 
But when a Boy and Barefoot
I more than once at Noon 

Have passed I thought a Whip Lash
Unbraiding in the Sun
When stooping to secure it
It wrinkled And was gone – 

Several of Nature’s People
I know and they know me
I feel for them a transport
Of Cordiality

But never met this Fellow
Attended or alone
Without a tighter Breathing
And Zero at the Bone. 

Amherst Poetry Festival Workshop Registration

Pre-registration is strongly suggested for the following Festival Workshops:

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Drawing Poems and Writing Pictures: A Workshop for Children and Adults
  • Saturday, September 21
  • Location TBA

In this family-friendly workshop, multilingual poet María Luisa Arroyo will warmly welcome and guide participants to draw pictures and write new poems. Multicultural and multilingual children’s books, such Francisco Alarcón’s Poems to Dream Together, will inspire participants of all ages and stages to create images and poems using their family or heart language(s). At the end, María Luisa will encourage participants to share their new work. 

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. “I See What You’re Saying”: A Poetry and Visual Arts Collaboration Workshop
  • Saturday, September 21
  • Location TBA

If a poet creates pictures with words, and an artist tells stories with images, what narrative possibilities emerge when the two work in tandem? This dynamic workshop will share inspiration, strategies, and prompts for creating imagery in response to words, creating words in response to imagery, and experimenting with the real-time collaborative high jinks of mixing the two. Participants will look at highlights from landmark collaborations by Frank O’Hara and Larry Rivers, Anne Carson and Bianca Stone. This workshop is perfect for all levels in either writing or visual art. Participants will leave feeling electrified by new ways of thinking and creating and with an original visual/verse piece! 

Please fill out the form below to secure your space. You will receive a success message once your form has submitted. An Amherst Poetry Festival representative will contact you via email with a confirmation and more information.

Answering optional questions helps us collect demographic information to improve the Festival. Responses are not shared with facilitators.
Three smiling volunteers at the Amherst poetry fest, 2009

Amherst Art Walk with Jan Freeman and Ellen Hart

Date: Thursday, August 6, 2018
Time: 5-8 p.m.
Location:
Homestead Parlor

Join us for our monthly Amherst Art Walk program.

This month, poet and Paris Press Executive Director Jan Freeman and Ellen Hart, co-editor (along with Emily Dickinson International Society President Martha Nell Smith) of the Paris Press publication Open Me Carefully, will be the featured readers starting at 7 pm in the Homestead parlor. Freeman and Hart’s presentation will address women’s voices, past and present, in publication. Paris Press, founded in 1995 as a platform for overlooked women’s literature, published Open Me Carefully in 1998, which features Emily Dickinson’s 40-year correspondence with her sister-in-law and neighbor Susan Huntington Dickinson. Freeman and Hart’s readings will explore the arc of a relationship through these letters and through Freeman’s own contemporary poetry.

Tours of The Evergreens will also be offered for $5 from 5pm to 7 pm.

Accessibility

Accessibility

The Emily Dickinson Museum welcomes all visitors.

Physical Accessibility

Our Tour Center and first floors of the Homestead and The Evergreens and a portion of the museum grounds are wheelchair accessible. Due to their historic architecture, the second floors of each house are not completely accessible to wheelchair users and other visitors who need to avoid stairs.

For planning purposes, please note the following:

  • Because of the historic nature of the two Dickinson houses, neither house includes an elevator to the second floor.
  • The first floor of the Homestead includes the Tour Center, parlors, and library. Emily Dickinson’s bedroom is accessed by a fifteen-step staircase with double railings.
  • The Evergreens is located approximately one block from the Homestead and is reachable by paved sidewalk or a mulched path. Visitors with disabilities may park in The Evergreens driveway upon request. The first floor is wheelchair accessible. The second floor is accessed by a thirteen-step staircase with a railing on one side.
  • Because of the wealth of original materials at The Evergreens, visitors with respiratory difficulties may be sensitive to the air quality in the house. 
  • Visitors who are unable to use the stairs are provided with illustrated notebooks describing the exhibits in the upstairs of each house, as well as an iPad with 360 degree view of Dickinson’s bedroom. Staff are present to answer questions about the spaces.
  • Modern chairs are provided in each room for visitor comfort.

Sign Language Interpretation

  • Sign-language interpretation is available free of charge for tours and museum programs by request with two week’s notice.

Service Animals

  • Service dogs are welcome throughout the property, including both historic houses.

Care Partners

  • Care partners of visitors with disabilities will be admitted for free.

Accessible Parking

  • Two spaces are designated for visitors with disabilities in the Museum’s driveway. If a space is not available upon your arrival, please call (413) 542-2947 for assistance.
  • The driveway may be used for drop-off.  Find general parking information.

For further questions about accessibility, or to suggest how we might continue to improve the visitor experience, please contact the museum at bsteinhauser@emilydickinsonmuseum.org.