The Evergreens house behind a huge tree in autumn

1965

The Homestead is purchased by Amherst College and is open to the public for tours. In 1991, The Evergreens is passed to a private testamentary trust, the Martha Dickinson Bianchi Trust, which began developing the house as a museum. 

White house captured from North Pleasant Street with a fence in front

1840, April

The Dickinsons purchase and move to a house (no longer standing) on North Pleasant Street in Amherst.

1865

The Civil War ends. 

2003, July 1

The Emily Dickinson Museum is founded after the Homestead and The Evergreens are merged under the ownership of Amherst College. 

1840, September 7

Emily begins attending Amherst Academy with Lavinia. 

 

“It was given to me by the Gods –

When I was a little Girl – 

They give us Presents most – you know –

When we are new – and small. ” (Dickinson, Fr455)

2013, October 13

The launch of the Emily Dickinson Online Archive. The Online Archive is a free-access resource, allowing online visitors to view digitized images of Dickinson manuscripts held in multiple libraries and archives across the country. 

An artist's rendering of Mount Holyoke Women's seminary

1847, September

Emily Dickinson enrolls for one year at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley.

 

“This term is the longest in the year and I would not wish to live it over again, I can assure you. I love this Seminary and all the teachers are bound strongly to my heart by ties of affection. There are many sweet girls here and dearly do I love some new faces, but I have not yet found the place of a few dear ones filled, nor would I wish it to be here.” (Dickinson, L59)

 

black and white illustration of a dog

1866, 27 January

Death of Carlo, Emily Dickinson’s Newfoundland 

 

“Carlo died – […] would you instruct me now?” (Dickinson, L454)

Emily's bedroom with her dress and bed and writing table

Today

We live in an incredibly exciting time for Emily Dickinson scholarship. Through the efforts of many, Dickinson’s work is thriving throughout an international readership, forever securing her a place in literature and in a wider culture.