1875, 15 June

Emily Norcross Dickinson suffers a stroke that produces “a partial, lateral paralysis.” The next summer she falls and breaks her hip, becoming permanently bedridden, and requiring further care. For the next seven years, until her death in 1874, Emily and Lavinia cared for their mother in her convalescence. 

 

“…have never seen a daughter so devoted.” (Harriet Jameson, Lavinia’s neighbor, 11-10-[1882], Container 5, Jameson Papers)

Emily's bedroom with her dress and bed and writing table

Today

We live in an incredibly exciting time for Emily Dickinson scholarship. Through the efforts of many, Dickinson’s work is thriving throughout an international readership, forever securing her a place in literature and in a wider culture. 

1851, February

Emily Dickinson’s earliest known message to Susan Huntington Gilbert. Susan, a lifelong friend and early champion of Dickinson’s poetry, would go on to receive more than 250 poems from Dickinson, more than sent to any other correspondent.

 

“Don’t forget all the little friends who have tried so hard to be sisters, when indeed you were alone!” (Dickinson in an early letter to Susan, L101)

Thomas Gilbert (Gib) Dickinson

1875, August 1

Birth of Gilbert (“Gib”) Dickinson, Emily Dickinson’s nephew 

 

“Emily and all that she has are at Sue’s service, if of any comfort to Baby – Will send Maggie, if you will accept her.” (Dickinson, in a message to Susan)

1852, February 20

The Springfield Daily Republican publishes Dickinson’s “Sic transit gloria mundi” anonymously as “A Valentine.” 

1881

Mabel Loomis Todd and David Todd move to Amherst. Mabel Loomis Todd later becomes co-editor of the first volumes of Dickinson’s published poetry. 

1852, December 17

Election of Edward Dickinson as a member of the Whig Party to the United States Congress (1853-1855). Edward represented Massachusetts’ Tenth Congressional District.